Horseradish And Its Benefits

Horseradish And Its Benefits

Horseradish has been found to be a great source to aid in digestive disorders. It gives a nice boost to the immune system by giving the liver more power to filter out substances that might be harmful. It is also low in fat and a good choice to include in your diet when you are trying to loose weight. This spicy little root also has some medicinal uses that you might not know about. So, lets look at why you should think about growing some horseradish in your Indiana garden and include it in your diet. Besides having benefits to our health, it is also just down right tasty when used with vegetables and meats.

Some Facts About This Spicy Root

Horseradish is a perennial plant in the same family as mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage. The root of the plant is what is commonly used.

It ranks well in nutritional value as it contains potassium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. The mustard oil in horseradish has antibacterial properties that actually can help in food preservation.

A favorite addition to many recipes around the world and as a condiment on sandwiches, particularly roast beef.

There are some diuretic properties in horseradish and the roots have been used to treat various minor health problems, including urinary tract infections, bronchitis, sinus congestion, ingrowing toenails and coughs. Compounds found in horseradish have been found to kill some bacterial strains. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommends using this root when you are trying to lose weight due to it’s low fat and high flavor content.

Why Is It Called Horseradish?

If you are like me, you sometimes wonder why things are named what they are. In the case of our spicy little plant known to us as horseradish it is a little odd. Apparently the Germans called (and still do) this plant meerrettich. When the British discovered this plant they pronounced it “mare radish”. I am only going to assume that once it was brought across the big pond to America our reasoning was that a mare was a horse and somehow we decided we liked it referred to as horseradish. Who knows for sure, I’m just glad it was brought over and introduced to our gardens and our diets!

How do I grow this in my garden?

Actually it is a really easy plant to grow in an Indiana Garden. In fact, you have to be careful because if not watched this plant can take over a spot. Here is a video that tells you how to grow it:

Add horseradish to scrambled eggs, omelets, and hash browns to perk up your breakfast meals. It does not just have to be on a good steak.

horseradish plant
Horseradish Plant

 

You can actually get a plant now and start to grow it indoors during the winter months and then transplant it outdoors when the temperatures are warm enough for the plant to begin to thrive in a new environment. Just think, fresh horseradish to use now instead of later.

In a later post, I’ll give you some recipes to enjoy using horseradish that you have grown in your garden. How much fun is that?

Bees And Your Garden Crops

Bees And Your Garden Crops

It is time to continue with my short little series of attracting bees to our gardens whether we grow flowers, edible crops or both.  Today we will cover the edible variety of plants. Maybe you hadn’t thought about fruits and vegetable attracting bees. Many of them do get a little blossom on them that eventually becomes the food we are growing. The flowers can have nectar, pollen or both and some even need to be pollinated by the bee in order to produce.

bees on cherry blossoms

Sun loving plants do the best to attract bees. Areas that get close to 5 to 6 hours are the best. That doesn’t mean that you will never see a bee visit a plant that is in the shade.  They are just more likely to go for those in the sun.

Indiana Corn Postcard
Indiana Corn Postcard by Mamajo3304 at zazzle.com

Agricultural plants for bees in the garden:

  •  Strawberries bloom in May and June giving each bee both pollen and nectar
  • Sweet Corn blooms in June and July providing pollen for the bees
  • Cucumbers (that can be made into pickles) bloom from June through August giving nectar and pollen for a bee to feed on
  • Pumpkins produce blooms from July to the first frost and have both nectar and pollen
  • Melons bloom from June to the first frost and also have nectar and pollen for bees
  • Watermelons give a bee nectar and pollen during June and July
  • Herbs are really great to have and each type provides nectar during their blooming season

Strawberries, 'sparkle' Variety

Strawberries in bloom
Wally Eberhart Photo
at Allposters.com

We do not cultivate these plants but dandelions and clovers are especially loved by bees. They do not seem to care that us humans consider these plants both invasive and a weed. They like the nectar and pollen that are produced by them.

Pesticides and Insecticides Are Harmful To Bees

When it comes to planting plants in our gardens and taking care of our lawns, we often are encouraged to use pesticides to keep down the growth of weeds and to get rid of unwanted insects. It really is not a good idea. So many cancer causing agents have been linked to the ingredients used in pesticides and insecticides that we should not do it for our own health.  When it comes to bees they are really bad. The product may kill the bees and often times kills plants that they feed on. Look for natural products that can do the job without those nasty ingredients that are on the shelves today.

Our gardens in Indiana can produce luscious foods for us to eat and lovely flowers for us to enjoy while at the same time encouraging bees to survive and thrive in our areas. It is really important to keep a balance in the overall eco systems that are present in our living spaces and bees are an important part of that.

One last thought before I conclude my little series on bees in the garden. Not all bees produce honey but those that do provide a great food source for us to enjoy. Honey is a very healthy choice to have in our diets. Purchasing honey that has been produced locally is the best choice when choosing honey at a grocery store, the farmers market or wherever you make your honey purchases. I have to tell you that the best honey that I have ever tasted (and I buy exclusively now) is made just 5 miles from where I live. Try some local honey, you will not be disappointed!

Indiana Flowers Bees Love

Indiana Flowers Bees Love

coneflower If you have been following this blog, you know that a while back I started talking about Bees In The Garden and introduced you to some trees and shrubs that attract bees which are probably the most welcome of all wildlife visitors to our gardens. I promised to continue with other plants that you can have in your garden that promote the coming of the bees. I will concentrate on the Indiana flowers that bees love since that is what I am most familiar with. Remember the bees help pollinate your pretty flowers, fruit plants and vegetable plants so we want them to buzz around the garden with wanton abandon.

Today we will talk about the Indiana flowers that bees love to land on to get both nectar and pollen. They do need both for a balanced diet, if you remember and not all plants give both. Placing these plants in a sunny spot will work the best because the bees like the warmth of the sun. They do not care much for windy areas so keep that in mind, too. Oh, and another thing to keep in mind. Hybrid plants might be pretty with those blooms that are to die for but bees get no nourishment from them at all. Hybrids are bred to produce awesome blooms and in the process they loose the nectar and pollen that they would have naturally produced if they had been left alone. Now, don’t get me wrong I am not against those lovely plants, they just are not great for getting bees to your garden.

Purple Coneflower Notecard
Purple Coneflower Notecard by knotaway at Zazzle

Indiana Flowers To Plant For Bees:

  • Asters are great looking in a flower garden and produce nectar and pollen for bees from September to frost. They are also native to our area.
  • Black-eyed Susans bloom in June and July and provide nectar for the bees
  • Brown-eyed Susans bloom later in July and August giving more nectar
  • Candytuft shares their blooms in May and provide nectar
  • Cosmos provide pollen in August and September
  • Creeping Phlox looks so lovely in a rock garden during May and June and gives the bees some sweet nectar
  • Grape Hyacinth gives nectar while Hyacinth produces nectar and pollen, both bloom in April
  • Lavender produces nectar from June through September
  • Purple Coneflowers are native to Indiana and produce nectar in July and August
  • Salvia blooms in May and June giving the bees some nectar
  • Sunflowers bloom from June through September and the bees get both nectar and pollen from them
  • Zinnia plants give us color from August through October and the bees get nectar
Black-Eyed Susan and Wagon Wheel Photo Print
Black-Eyed Susan and Wagon Wheel Photo Print by NancyTrippPhotoGifts at zazzle.com

There are other flowers that will grow here in Indiana that also attract those precious bees but I did not include them on the list because they are difficult to find, at least in my local area. That is one of my pet peeves when it comes to shopping for plants or seeds. I’ll see this gorgeous plant in a magazine and I want it but find that it is not available. Well, then don’t temp me with it! I’m saving you the frustration by not even going there.

Another thing to remember is that bees can actually see color. The colors that they seem most attracted to are bright white, yellow and blue. That doesn’t mean they won’t go to a pink or red flower, they just like the other colors better.

In a later post we will talk about garden fruits and vegetables that bees love.

Bees Should Be Encouraged To Thrive

Bees Should Be Encouraged To Thrive

A Bee Does More Than Sting

You might not have given this much thought but it really is something to consider. Have you made your garden an inviting place for bees to come? You may be thinking, “What? I don’t want to get stung by a bee nor do I want my kids to be stung. No bees in my garden!” It is time to change your thinking if you feel that way. Bees are a necessity to every garden! Those plants rarely pollinate themselves, you know. When a bee travels from blossom to blossom it will carry the pollen on it’s feet and then it transfers to the next plant. That is a good thing! If they happen to be honey bees, then some hive is going to produce some delicious honey!

bees in garden

 

So, what plants do we have in Indiana that will create a bee garden? There are so many wonderful trees, shrubs, flowers, fruits and vegetables that bees love to come dine on. The trick is to have something in bloom during the entire growing season. You want those bees to keep coming back and to tell their friends to come, too. Providing plants that offer nectar and pollen gives each bee a balanced diet.

Vintage Bees and Daisy Post Card
Vintage Bee and Daisy Post Card by knottysailor at zazzle

 

Indiana Trees Good For Bees:

  • Apple trees provide both nectar and pollen and bloom from April to May
  • Pear trees provide nectar and bloom from April to May
  • Elm, Maple, Redbud and Oak trees provide pollen and nectar blooming in March and April
  • Walnut trees provide pollen and bloom in April and May
  • Tulip Poplar trees provide nectar and pollen blooming in May and June

Indiana Shrubs And Brambles That Every Bee Will Like:

  • Boxwood shrubs bloom in March and April and give the bees nectar
  • Blackberry and raspberry plants bloom in May and June providing both nectar and pollen
  • Butterfly Bush blooms July to September and gives them nectar to eat
  • Cotoneaster produces nectar and pollen in May and June
  • Roses produce pollen from June through September
  • Viburnum has nectar in May and June
Viburnum Post Card
Viburnum Post Card by florianesser at Zazzle.com

 

As I sit here writing this, I realize that I haven’t even scratched the surface on the plants that grow here in Indiana that can be a part of a bee garden. The longest list comes from the flowers, fruits and crops that also attract bees. So, I think I will make them separate posts so that this does not get too long.

Having any of the trees, shrubs and brambles in the above list as a part of your overall landscaping plan around your home is going to attract those much wanted little bees and have them buzzing around with delight.