Bees Should Be Encouraged To Thrive

Bees Should Be Encouraged To Thrive

A Bee Does More Than Sting

You might not have given this much thought but it really is something to consider. Have you made your garden an inviting place for bees to come? You may be thinking, “What? I don’t want to get stung by a bee nor do I want my kids to be stung. No bees in my garden!” It is time to change your thinking if you feel that way. Bees are a necessity to every garden! Those plants rarely┬ápollinate┬áthemselves, you know. When a bee travels from blossom to blossom it will carry the pollen on it’s feet and then it transfers to the next plant. That is a good thing! If they happen to be honey bees, then some hive is going to produce some delicious honey!

bees in garden

 

So, what plants do we have in Indiana that will create a bee garden? There are so many wonderful trees, shrubs, flowers, fruits and vegetables that bees love to come dine on. The trick is to have something in bloom during the entire growing season. You want those bees to keep coming back and to tell their friends to come, too. Providing plants that offer nectar and pollen gives each bee a balanced diet.

Vintage Bees and Daisy Post Card
Vintage Bee and Daisy Post Card by knottysailor at zazzle

 

Indiana Trees Good For Bees:

  • Apple trees provide both nectar and pollen and bloom from April to May
  • Pear trees provide nectar and bloom from April to May
  • Elm, Maple, Redbud and Oak trees provide pollen and nectar blooming in March and April
  • Walnut trees provide pollen and bloom in April and May
  • Tulip Poplar trees provide nectar and pollen blooming in May and June

Indiana Shrubs And Brambles That Every Bee Will Like:

  • Boxwood shrubs bloom in March and April and give the bees nectar
  • Blackberry and raspberry plants bloom in May and June providing both nectar and pollen
  • Butterfly Bush blooms July to September and gives them nectar to eat
  • Cotoneaster produces nectar and pollen in May and June
  • Roses produce pollen from June through September
  • Viburnum has nectar in May and June
Viburnum Post Card
Viburnum Post Card by florianesser at Zazzle.com

 

As I sit here writing this, I realize that I haven’t even scratched the surface on the plants that grow here in Indiana that can be a part of a bee garden. The longest list comes from the flowers, fruits and crops that also attract bees. So, I think I will make them separate posts so that this does not get too long.

Having any of the trees, shrubs and brambles in the above list as a part of your overall landscaping plan around your home is going to attract those much wanted little bees and have them buzzing around with delight.


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Beverly Owens

Bev has been decorating rooms and homes since she was a little kid, starting with her own bedroom. She loves to share ideas for decorating different rooms in the home along with some outstanding products that she finds from time to time. Join her on Google+

Comments

  1. We love bees! I’ve never been stung by a bee, nor has anyone in our home. One of my fondest gardening memories was seeing my precious preschool son kneeling by the flower pots just watching the bees. He was absolutely fascinated by them. He didn’t touch, poke, or swat at them and they certainly didn’t bother him.

    What I did not realize is that some trees attract bees too! That is awesome and I am so glad you shared that information.

  2. Interesting facts about the flowering trees that attract bees. I remember as a child in New York State when our backyard pussy willow tree would be filled with bees during the time the blossoms were out. I didn’t know about the Redbud tree (one of my favorites). We had one in our yard in Missouri, but I don’t remember if bees visited or not.

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  1. […] you have been following this blog, you know that a while back I started talking about Bees In The Garden and introduced you to some trees and shrubs that attract bees which are probably the most welcome […]

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